Tour the Bloxom Residence with Historic Seattle

Bloxom

On Saturday, May 21st, join Historic Seattle on a tour of the Bloxom Residence.  The home was designed by Arthur Loveless and completed in 1928.  Loveless was a local architect who moved to Seattle in 1907 after dropping out of Columbia University, where he had studied architecture. During the 1920s, Loveless became highly regarded locally for a series of impressive residential commissions he completed in a distinctive Tudor Revival style. With its half-timbering, hanging tiles, projecting gables, massive chimney blocks, and asymmetry, the Bloxom residence fits tidily within Loveless’ oeuvre.

The Bloxom Residence was built in a planned community developed by David Whitcomb, Sr., which is today known as Woodway.  Whitcomb’s vision was of a woodland residential community with easy access to the city along Pacific Highway. The sales of lots came with setback requirements, a prohibition on subdividing lots to less than two acres, and a prohibition on building more than one home on each two-acre lot. The intent was to maintain breathing space and the country-like atmosphere in perpetuity, preventing the kind of development that inevitably destroyed that peacefulness in city homes.

Whitcomb’s original vision can still be seen today in the Bloxom Residence and its grounds. Despite changes subsequent owners have made to the property, the house retains its original English-manorial character and still sits in a landscape of ponds, formal and cutting gardens, and a great lawn that spreads out to a bluff overlooking Puget Sound. Lindsey and Carolyn Echelbarger, present owners, have enlarged the kitchen, relocated the dining room and repurposed the original dining room into a den, added custom oak paneling and built-ins and made other improvements both indoors and out. The walls showcase an outstanding collection of work by early 20th century Pacific Northwest regional artists.

For more information about this event – http://historicseattle.org/event/bloxom-residence/

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