Seattle Area Market: Prices Are Rising, People Are Buying

812 W GalerS&P/Case-Shiller released its Home Price Index for April today, and the numbers paint a familiar picture of the Seattle-area housing market: prices are rising, and people are buying. The average price for a single-family home in the area comprising King, Snohomish, and Pierce counties rose 0.9 percent in April from March, and was up 7.5 percent over the year. Despite the rise in prices, homes are selling in an average of 8 days in Seattle, and the number of completed sales in the three-county region was up a staggering 38 percent from last April. According to Zillow, the median single-family home in the area will now cost you $366,100.

Compared to the blistering pace of price gains at this time last year, when prices were up 11.2 percent on a yearly basis, gains seem to be moderating. In reference to the housing market as a whole, Zillow Chief Economist Stan Humphries said in a statement that “Normal home value growth is usually between 3 percent and 5 percent annually, well below growth rates of just a year ago, so the current pace is far more sustainable.” While the Seattle area’s growth has not fallen into that threshold yet, we’re not seeing the sustained growth of last year, when prices in the area grew by double digits on a yearly basis for 14 consecutive months. San Francisco and Denver are leading the nation in appreciation, with home prices having risen by 10 percent and 10.3 percent respectively.

It is still a great time to sell in the Seattle area, so if you are interested in listing your home, contact your local real estate agent today!

Seattle Homes Selling In Average of 8 Days

3804 E Blaine St.Across the U.S., houses are selling at breakneck speed, with homes only surviving on the market for an average of 28 days before being snatched up by eager buyers. Many homes sold even faster than that in May, with approximately 35 percent going into contract within two weeks of hitting the market. But you think that’s fast? The national market has nothing on Seattle, where last month homes sold after a mere 8 days on the market, and almost half sold above list price, according to Redfin. This no doubt is due to extremely low inventory, especially within the Seattle city limits, where there is less than a month’s supply of homes available, not nearly enough to satisfy the high demand for homes in the city.

Despite this increased buying activity, national home prices actually grew at a slower rate this May – up just 1.6 percent over April – compared to the 3 percent rise in prices we saw last May. On a yearly basis, prices across the country are up 6 percent from a year ago. List prices in the Seattle market increased just slightly from April to May (1.4 percent), and the median was $426,000. Year over year, Seattle prices were up 6.5 percent.

As these statistics illustrate, now is a great time to sell your home! If you’re on the fence, contact your local real estate agent to learn more about the selling process.

Millennials Opt Out of Seattle’s Real Estate Goat Rodeo

Mt Baker

The fact that the housing market in Seattle is hot, is not new news, and finding a home without over paying is becoming quite a task. When a 1,100 square foot home listed at $559k, sells for $717K, it feels it might take miracle to lock something down that is both desirable and reasonable. Moreover, when, and more so, if¸ you find a great buy, the market heavily favors those willing and able to pay cash to win the bid. Well, there is one demographic of Puget Sound residents who aren’t jumping on the real estate bandwagon – millennials.

According to the Puget Sound Business Journal, people between the ages of 25 and 35 who are homeowners is at the lowest since the Gold Rush era. And for good reason. Overall, things are just more expensive now than they were during the previous decades. College tuition has tripled since 1980, causing millennials to take out college loans or needing to take a longer time getting their education due to having to work simultaneously. As such, paying off acquired debt, or simply just getting the basics (job, place to live, overhead costs) nailed down is priority number one. With such a competitive job market, it takes a few years (or ten) of hard work to reach reasonable earning potential.

open-house-illustration

However, Seattle has some of the biggest businesses headquartered here favoring hiring millennials, one of which is Amazon. The online retailer hires thousands of employees yearly, many of which are coming in out of state. Most of those recruits, still fresh to Seattle and a little leery of all the grey, are perfectly content with renting even if they could afford a nice house to match their nice salary. And this doesn’t just happen for Amazon employees, as Seattle has plenty company employees working the same model.

Not surprisingly, this might be a piece of why Seattle currently ranks second on the list of best cities to own a rental property (a jump from seventh place last year). The region’s job growth, paired with the number of people moving into the area, and with the lack of available homes for sale, these are some key factors in why the rental market is going so well. So, for now the millennials are opting out of Seattle’s real estate goat rodeo, but it doesn’t seem like too many people, no matter how ready, are having much success either.

Young Owners’ Share Of Market Lowest Since 1900

1510 37th NewThere likely aren’t many facets of today’s housing market that can be compared to that of the Gold Rush era, but according to a recent article in The Seattle Times, young homeowners’ share of the market has regressed to early 20th Century rates. Among Millenials (25-34 year olds) in King County today, only a quarter own their own homes, on par with statistics for that age group in 1900. The percentage has dropped by 13 percent since the housing market peak in 2007, and it has fallen twice as fast as the national average, according to the Times.

By comparison, about 50 percent of homeowners in 1980 were from the 25-34-year-old age bracket, and 80 percent of young married couples making the median income or higher owned their own home. An increasing number of young people have been delaying marriage, and without the financial security of a two-income household, home ownership is out of reach for many young single people. Even in Seattle’s strong job market, singles and couples earning good incomes are increasingly held back by the area’s skyrocketing home prices, as well as student debt that is five times higher than it was 10 years ago.

But the article suggests that another factor could be simply that home ownership isn’t as attractive as it used to be, and young people just don’t want to buy. Many millenials had just graduated from college just as the economic crisis hit, shaking their confidence in real estate as a good investment. Even with the median rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Seattle hovering around $1,800 per month, it appears that a large portion the city’s population of young workers is choosing the low-maintenance flexibility of renting over the responsibilities of ownership. Apartment living as changed dramatically in recent years, and with the breadth of amenities ranging from community gardens to deluxe bicycle maintenance areas, yoga rooms, and rooftop fire pits, renting offers perks that owning a home can’t, with the added bonus of not being tied to a mortgage.

If you would like more information about renting or buying in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!