No Slowdown Predicted For Market During Holiday Season

As we head into the holidays, real estate experts in the area predict that the Puget Sound market will not see the typical slowdowns associated with the season. Listings often drop off during this time of year, as potential sellers are more focused on holiday events, but with sustained demand for homes in our region, the next few months are going to be a great time to sell a home. The area comprising King, Kitsap, Pierce, and Snohomish counties saw the highest number of pending sales in a decade in October, and those high sales volumes are predicted to continue.

Though median sales prices for single-family homes are down in King County on a monthly basis, from $490,250 in September to $480,000 in October, prices are up by 7 percent over the year, according to statistics from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. Similarly, Seattle’s market saw prices dip slightly from $571,000 in September to $555,000 in October, but rose by almost 8 percent over October 2014. However, some neighborhoods within Seattle saw significant monthly gains, such as Queen Anne and Magnolia, where the median price rose from $699,950 in September to nearly $800,000 in October.

Inventory continues to slide, as there were 10 percent fewer homes on the market in King County in October than in September, and 32 percent fewer than this time last year. Since inventory historically drops anyway at this time of year, the supply of homes could become especially tight, likely prompting an increase in prices. Though well-priced homes are selling quickly, overpriced homes are seeing longer stints on the market, emphasizing the need for an experienced real estate agent who can establish a listing price that will garner your home the most attention possible.

These statistics were gathered from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service, but were not compiled or published by that organization.

Seattle Condos Appreciating Faster Than Homes

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Featured condo – 1000 1st Ave., Unit 2202, Seattle, 98104

Condominium property values were some of the hardest hit after the housing crash, with the typical condo in the U.S. losing a third of its value. But according to a recent Zillow survey, condos are finally making a long-awaited comeback and are appreciating more quickly than single-family homes in many U.S. markets, including Seattle’s.

According to statistics from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service (NWMLS), the median sales price for a condo in Seattle in October was $368,000, up 23 percent over the year, compared to an 8 percent price increase for single-family homes. Condos in many neighborhoods within the city saw much higher rates of appreciation. Prices increased by 55 percent in Southeast Seattle (Columbia City, Rainier Valley, Seward Park), and by 45 percent in both Beacon Hill and the Ballard/Green Lake/Phinney Ridge area. Prices for condos in Seattle’s most expensive market, comprising Downtown and Belltown, rose by 34 percent over the year to a median of $539,000, and Queen Anne condo prices are the highest in a decade.

The condo market may be especially attractive to first-time home buyers, who are largely being priced out of Seattle’s expensive single-family market. Condos are often more affordable and lower maintenance, and many offer the urban lifestyle that young professionals are increasingly attracted to. Seattle’s condo market is also suffering from a lack of inventory with only 1.18 months’ worth of supply available (compared to the 4-6 months’ worth that is generally considered a ‘balanced’ market) which could be another factor helping drive price increases. Currently, there are 107 condos on the market in Downtown Seattle, ranging from $209,900 for a 447-square-foot unit at Vine and Western, to $9,990,000 for the 6,758-square-foot full-floor penthouse at the Madison Tower.

Zillow’s Chief Economist Svenja Gudell wrote in the survey summary that, “Over the past few years, buying a condo hasn’t always been considered an investment on par with buying a single-family home. Clearly, the most recent data indicate that notion may be due for a second look.”

If you are curious how much your condo might be worth, please do not hesitate to contact one of our real estate agents!

Late Summer Gains For Seattle Area Housing Market

neighborhoodThe S&P/Case-Shiller Index numbers for August were released yesterday, and after a July where we saw average home prices decrease by 0.1 percent in the Seattle Metro Area (King, Pierce, and Snohomish counties), prices bounced back and increased by 0.7 percent in August. On a yearly basis, prices in the area grew by 7.6 percent, coming in at number five on the list of cities with the highest yearly gains among the top 20 metro areas in the index.

Though prices in the Seattle are are still four percent below their peak, overall prices are showing steady growth and much of it is coming from a surprising sector of the housing market: condos. Zillow’s Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell said in a statement that in the national market “…a good portion of the overall home price growth we’re seeing, especially in cities, has been driven by strong growth in condominium values, which are currently appreciating more quickly than single-family homes.” He cited condos’ popularity with younger buyers, many of whom live more urban lifestyles, are looking for more affordable housing options than single-family homes. This appears to be true in the Seattle market, as according to statistics from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service, median condo prices in King County were up 19 percent this August over August 2014. The median price for a condo in Seattle was up 32 percent over the same time period to $248,500.

Overall, it appears that the U.S. market is leveling out. Zillow’s Gudell says that “Annual U.S. home value appreciation has stabilized and settled into a nice groove over the past few months, and this relative stability should continue into the foreseeable future.”

If you’re interested in speaking with a real estate expert about Seattle’s market, contact your local agent today.

Real Estate Site Ranks Seattle No. 1 Housing Market

1150 17th Ave E-33. straightened smalljpgReal estate website has ranked the Seattle area the No. 1 housing market in the country for single-family homes, according to its analysis of home prices, sales data, demand, and economic factors. They point out the combination of strong price growth, at 10.9 percent over the year, and an equally strong increase in sales over the year, at 12.6 percent, as indicators of our market’s overall strength. The Seattle area’s solid job market keeps attracting new residents, and relative affordability compared to other tech hubs such as San Francisco, San Jose, and New York has seen demand continue unabated. Coupled with the fact that it is still 13 percent less expensive to buy rather than rent in Seattle means that everyone is trying to get their piece of the Seattle real estate pie.

Rounding out the top five behind Seattle are three areas in Florida – Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, and Palm Beach County – followed by our little sister to the south, Portland, where prices grew by 9.4 percent over the year.

If you are interested in buying or selling a home in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!

Understanding the Basics of Appraisals


A home appraisal is a step of the mortgage process when an unbiased state-licensed professional determines a home’s value based on size, condition, function, and the quality of the home. To do this the appraiser must first inspect the property. Then, by researching similar homes within the area and comparing recent residential sales, the appraiser will present their “opinion of value” with all supporting data and research used to come to their conclusion.

The appraisal process is important because mortgage lenders require an appraisal before they’ll provide a home buyer a loan. This is because the value of the property will likely determine how much a lender will lend. Lenders want to make sure that homeowners aren’t over borrowing because the home serves as collateral for the mortgage. So, if the borrower were to default on the mortgage and go into foreclosure, the lender would be able to get back the money they lent by selling the house.

If you’re a buyer, a home appraisal also can function as protection for the client too. If an appraisal comes in higher than the price being paid for the residence, than the borrower will have more home equity than initially expected. Also, an appraisal can help protect a client in keeping them from overpaying for a home, if the appraisal comes in lower than the asking price.

If you’re a seller, you want your home to be appraised for the amount you’ve listed it for.  In order for that to happen there are a few things you can do to impact that number. Clean, updated, well-maintained houses tend to receive higher appraisals. Make sure things like the home’s exterior and curb appeal is one that is eye catching, holes in the drywall are patched, and rug stains are cleaned can help. It’s also a good idea to provide your appraiser with a list of recent list of improvement you’ve made to the home as well as a list of attractive aspects about your neighborhood. Be sure to mention items like grocery stores, parks, and neighboring schools.

If you are unhappy with the appraisal, sometimes there is an option to appeal called “Reconsiderations of Value.” So, if there were enhancements made your home or recent comparable residential sales that happened the neighborhood to which wasn’t considered in the initial appraisal, it’s important to provide this information to your lender. Also, getting a second appraisal is always available to the buyer as well. Lastly, it’s important to add that an appraisal that was conducted beyond six month prior will likely be considered out of date by a lender.

King County Home Prices Bounce Back in August

1After the median selling price for a single-family home in King County dropped to $485,000 in July, prices bounced back to just a hair under $500,000 in August, representing a 14.4 percent annual gain, and the biggest yearly gain of any month in 2015. Inventory in King County was also up slightly from July, and now stands at 1.36 months’ worth of supply, the most inventory we’ve seen since February, according to statistics from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. In contrast, median prices within the sub-market of Seattle stayed essentially flat last month, having dropped by just $500 from $575,500 in July to $575,000 in August. However, that is a 15 percent increase over August 2014.

Inventory in Seattle followed King County’s lead and increased by a small increment to .91 month’s supply, up from .74 months’ worth in July. Lack of inventory continues to put pressure on the market in the Puget Sound region, with total listings down 29.7 percent in King County and down 32.7 percent in Seattle since this time last year. “The biggest challenges our buyers face are lack of inventory and the quality of homes to choose from,” MLS director George Moorhead said in a statement. Some believe this continued double-digit price growth combined with lack of available properties is not sustainable and that we may see a slowdown in the market as we enter the fall season, when inventory historically drops by about half.

The area condo market has made great strides over the year, especially in Seattle, where the median price rose from $299,000 in August 2014 to $395,000 this year – a staggering 32 percent. Prices increased more modestly countywide, but still showed strong growth with a 19 percent rise.

If you are interested in buying or selling a home in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!

Only 2% of Seattle Renters Plan To Buy Within Year

371 ProspectSeattle is home to one of the nation’s highest homeownership confidence rates, according to Zillow’s recently released Housing Confidence Index (ZHCI), but our region’s soaring home prices could be causing renters to think twice about entering the home-buying market. According to a Zillow report, only two percent of renters in Seattle are planning to purchase a home in the next year, which is far below the national average of 11.4 percent and the lowest rate among the top 20 metro areas. Miami led all metros with 21 percent of renters planning to buy in the upcoming year, despite a healthy 8.9 percent year-over-year home value increase.

The Seattle Times cited another statistic from Zillow stating that even among renters making $90,000+ per year, 48 percent said they were not planning to buy in the next five years. In the most recent census data available (from 2013), the biggest growth in the rental market was from those making $100,000+ per year. Though some of Seattle renters’ hesitation may largely have to do with discouragement over the high prices and bidding wars that have become the new normal, many are consciously choosing renting for the flexibility it allows. With the plethora of luxury apartment buildings sprouting all over Seattle, many offering amenities akin to those at high-end hotels, renting, and avoiding the obligations of home ownership, is looking more and more appealing to many.

But just because renters are staying out of the fray doesn’t mean no one’s buying, in fact, quite the opposite. Even with almost a third fewer listings this August than August 2014, pending sales and closed sales in King County were both up this August compared to a year ago, according to statistics from the Northwest Multiple Listing Service. After a slight dip in home prices in July, the median price for a single-family home in King County bounced back to just a hair under $500,000 at $499,950 in August. The Seattle area’s market also rose from 10th to 2nd on Zillow’s Housing Confidence Index.

If you are interested in buying or selling a home in the Seattle area, contact your local real estate agent today!

Home Tips: Prepare Your House For Fall

Fall has truly begun in Seattle this week, with leaves changing color seemingly overnight, and warm temperatures giving way to crisp fall air. Before you begin cozying up inside for the months ahead, there are several things you can do to prepare your home and yard for wet, cold weather. Here are some tips for making sure you and your house make it through the cold season unscathed:


  • If you’re handy and can safely do it yourself, make sure your gutters are clear of leaves and debris. If not, hire a professional to do it for you.
  • Make sure your roof is in good shape. The last thing you want is a roof leak in the middle of the rainy season!
  • Trim back shrubs and bushes at the base of your house. Anything that can trap water near your home’s foundation is a recipe for water damage, so make sure your landscaping directs water away from your house.
  • Make sure your home is air- and water tight. In addition to saving you money on energy costs, making sure your house is sealed up makes it more comfortable and prevents potential water damage. Make sure your windows and doors are weatherstripped and are sealing tightly, and if drafts are still sneaking in under your doors, consider using a “door snake” for additional insulation.
  • If you have a fireplace, have the inside and chimney cleaned and inspected by a professional, and give the exterior a good scrubbing yourself. has some great tips on how to clean your fireplace here.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
  • Winterize your outdoor faucets and pipes. Read tips on winterization here from Seattle Public Utilities.
  • Make sure your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are functioning correctly. Washington state law states that you must have a carbon monoxide detector installed outside of each sleeping area and on each floor of your house. Fall leaves
  • Do some yard maintenance to ensure safety. Since it will most likely be dark when you leave your house in the morning and when you come home in the evening, consider installing outdoor lights. Solar-powered options cost you nothing in energy costs, and many models switch on automatically at dusk and turn off at dawn. No brainer. Also, make sure your walkways and porches are free of cracks, moss, and leaves that can make them slippery.

Commercial Lease Rates Hitting New Heights In Seattle

seattle sunsetThe Highway 99 Blues Club, established in 2004 and located in the basement of a hundred-year-old brick building, is possibly one of the best blues clubs in Seattle. As reported by The Seattle Times, in June, the business was notified that their rent would be increasing. Somewhat normal and understandable considering the immense growth Seattle overall is experiencing, especially downtown. However, their rent isn’t going up just $500, or even $1,000. Starting in January 2016, the blues club, if they intended on staying, would be responsible for paying $14, 959 a month. That’s an increase of 225 percent (or $10,359 more a month) and how the business sees it, an eviction notice.

The commercial real estate market in Seattle is reaching new heights, quite literally and figuratively speaking, so much so that downtown tenants, like the Highway 99 Blues club, are being squeezed out due to astronomical rent increases. This gentrification of downtown Seattle is well supported, as companies haven’t a problem finding tenants to fill local office space in exchange for a pretty penny. In fact, not only are rents 7.5 percent higher (an average of $36.76 a square foot) than last year, but in June of this year “the vacancy rate was 11.4 percent, down nearly by half from its high of 21 percent five years ago,” according to the Seattle Times.

This rise in lease rates in Seattle, Bellevue, and surrounding areas has been greater than any other metro area in the US, and that includes tech hotspots like San Francisco, San Jose, Boston, and New York, according to the New York based market research firm Reis. Still, Seattle is cheaper than Manhattan, San Francisco, and London, and currently offers a thriving and exponentially growing technology and health industry. In fact, many San Francisco-based businesses are on the hunt for Seattle offices, including cloud-computing giant,

It’s been reported that three-quarters of newly occupied office space in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties is located in downtown Seattle. Last year a top floor office space went for $30 a square foot, this year a lower floor office space in the same building is asking $36 a square foot. That’s a 20 percent rent increase. Demand for land is what is moving these prices, as business owners are paying huge premiums and signing large lease transactions in order secure a spot to set up shop.

Adding to the difficultly in securing an already existing office in downtown Seattle or nearby areas, many companies are signing pre-leases on buildings that are still under construction. Some of these companies being:

-          Amazon just leased 817,000-square-feet of Troy Block, which is part of two-building project in South Lake Union.

-          Holland America Line just leased Martin Selig’s new 185,000 square foot building in Lower Queen Anne, set to open next year.

-          Tableau Software is set to lease a new 2016 210,000-square-foot building north of Gas Works Park.

-          And Juno Therapeutics leased 287,000 square foot building which is under construction at 400 Dexter Ave. N in South Lake Union.

It certainly seems “Seattle is a landlords market,” Stuart Williams, managing director of commercial real-estate brokerage JLL told The Seattle Times. This isn’t a playground for the mom and pop smaller tenant. This game is only available for big time tenants ready to pay up, commit to long term leases and wait patiently for their space in the ever changing Seattle metropolis.

Millennials Are Buying Homes After All

broadview homewwThe National Association of Realtors 2015 report on generational trends showed that millennials make up the largest share of homebuyers, sitting at 32 percent. According to a recent TD Bank Survey of 1,002 adults, millennials who are currently between the ages 25 and 34 will be looking to purchase their first home over the next two years. Alas, putting to rest their reputation as the transient renter generation.

As the older tier of Gen Y rounds into their early 30s, many of whom didn’t experience the housing crisis firsthand, they view home buying with innovative eyes. Millennials see the potential in the “fixer upper” home and aren’t ruling them out as viable housing options. Just as likely to roll up their sleeves as the generations before them, millennials like the idea of tailoring their home to their needs.  Despite being laden with college loans and debt, and maybe because of that, Gen Y-ers are also less romantic about the process – purchasing before marriage, owning for shorter amount of time and flipping with success. There is as much risk as there is reward, and this robust generation isn’t questioning if the rewards exists.

Beyond changing the home owner relationship, this generation is also changing the home buying process. “We’re on our phones all the time, and this generation does not like to pick up the phone,” Player Murray, managing broker at Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices York Simpson Underwood Realty told US News. “They don’t want to bother with a conversation if it can be texted.” And because it’s predicted that millennials will (soon) rise as the generation buying the largest number of homes this year, their preference in how the process works, matter – big time. Nela Richardson, chief economist for the real estate company Redfin, agrees that “because of their size, whatever they decide to do will have an impact on the housing market,” and really, with smart phones and searching apps like Redfin and Zillow, Richardson is on to something.

This tech-savvy generation is spearheading change in many industries and real estate has been no exception. As Gen Y-ers overtake baby boomers in the home buying game, there is a ripple effect. Being that only 3 percent of agents are under 30, and 81 percent of real estate agents are over the age of 45, according to a NAR survey of its members, the tables have turned and the consumer isn’t being served by its own age group.

It’s not that Gen Y-ers aren’t buying homes, they are, just on their terms. They know what they want, which is not a phone call, but rather a text or app that will give them the freedom to research on their time. They do their homework – they aren’t looking for an access point to the information, as that is already at their fingertips, what they are looking for is a person to interpret the information and not leave anything out. Surprises aren’t fun for this generation, but home improvement projects are!